military

Author: Joseph

Published Date:

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How My Air Force Career Shaped me to Be a Leader

From the foot soldiers of the Roman Empire and Genghis Khan’s cavalry to today’s military, the contributions, and leadership of people in uniform have stood the test of time.

I spent eight years in the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserve and the leadership lessons I learned have lasted a lifetime. I often rely on my military leadership lessons to lead sales and business teams today.

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Here are a few of the most enduring lessons I learned. Whether you have served or not, you can take some of these golden nuggets and apply them to your business:

It’s Not About “You.” It’s About “Us”

The moment enlisted or officers start their initial training – the core value is the same. No one person is greater than the team. If you are a lone wolf, you won’t go far. From the minute your service begins, you learn that the sum is more significant than its parts. The team is everything.

Read more at How My Air Force Experience Shaped Me to Be a Leader | U.S. Veterans Magazine (usveteransmagazine.com).

You can also download the full digital edition here: U.S. Veterans Magazine Fall 2021 Page 0 (usveteransmagazine.com) or subscribe at Subscribe – US Veterans and Military Magazine | A US Veterans News Resource (usveteransmagazine.com)

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Asymmetric Selling – The Predictable Revenue Podcast

Author – Collin Stewart

TIME IS NON-LINEAR

The Native American perception of time, Joe Paranteau explains on a recent episode of the Predictable Revenue Podcast, is non-linear. It is circular and ever-moving, like a clock or a sundial. Joe has found it helpful to think of the sales process as a non-linear occurrence. At the end of the sales cycle is both new and continuous: a project launch and the forging of a deeper relationship. But that doesn’t mean you never look back. Quite the opposite. The concept of honour is very important in Native American culture, and in looking at time as a continuum the people honour the past as a historical guide to inform the present and future. In sales, Joe likens this to looking back at win rates, conversion rates, and other insights to continue improving the process.

Non-linear time also helps salespeople to “sell through the close,” rather than feel like their responsibilities end when the sale is made. The more effort a salesperson puts into growing the relationship, building a strong customer success plan, and making the buying process smooth, the more likely the deal at hand is to spawn more.

MILITARY INFLUENCE

Native Americans serve in the military at a greater rate than any other ethnic minority. Joe explains that it’s part of their warrior culture – so in spite of the fact that he once said to himself he’d never join the military, he was drawn to serving and eventually did for a while during and through the end of the Cold War. 

You can read more at Asymmetric Sales Strategies ⎪Predictable Revenue and watch the interview on (8) Asymmetric Selling – YouTube